Apple’s AR glasses could be closer as manufacturer hints collaboration

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  • Apple recently filed a patent application showing how the glasses would work
  • A company that makes metal casings for Apple may make parts for the glasses
  • Catcher Technology says there’s still challenges to overcome with AR wearables
  • The Apple AR glasses patent details a head-mounted, touch-screen display that could work alongside an iPhone, representing points of interest in real time 

Cecile Borkhataria For Dailymail.com

Rumors that Apple is planning to bring introduce augmented reality smart glasses have been swirling since March.

In July, it was revealed that the tech giant filed a patent application showing how the AR glasses would work.

Now, it’s reported that Catcher Technology, a Taiwanese company that manufactures metal casings for Apple products, may also make parts for Apple’s AR glasses. 

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The Apple AR glasses patent details a head-mounted, touch-screen display that could work alongside an iPhone. It could work in tandem with an iPhone, representing points of interest (a landmark or an object such as a moving car) in a view of a real environment

The Apple AR glasses patent details a head-mounted, touch-screen display that could work alongside an iPhone. It could work in tandem with an iPhone, representing points of interest (a landmark or an object such as a moving car) in a view of a real environment

The Apple AR glasses patent details a head-mounted, touch-screen display that could work alongside an iPhone. It could work in tandem with an iPhone, representing points of interest (a landmark or an object such as a moving car) in a view of a real environment

Allen Horng, the chairman of Catcher Technology, did not confirm what project his company is working on, but there has been speculation that it’s working on Apple’s AR product – given that the company already works with Apple on its product casings.

‘Based on what we have learned, [new AR products] need to look good and be light enough to wear … that makes the casings for such device very complicated to manufacture and there are still a lot of challenges to overcome currently,’ Allen Horng said in an earnings conference on Tuesday, November 7th. 

IS APPLE MAKING AR GLASSES? 

There has been speculation that Apple is developing an AR headset that may work in tandem with the iPhone. 

Catcher Technology, a Taiwanese company that manufactures metal casings for Apple products, may also make parts for Apple’s AR glasses.

In an interview with Nikkei Asian Review, Allen Horng, the chairman of Catcher Technology, did not confirm what project his company is working on, but there has been speculation that it’s working on Apple’s AR product given that the company already works with Apple on its product casings. 

The Apple AR glasses patent details a head-mounted, touch-screen display that could work alongside an iPhone. It presents a way of representing points of interest (a landmark or an object) in a view of a real environment on an iPhone screen (pictured) 

The Apple AR glasses patent details a head-mounted, touch-screen display that could work alongside an iPhone. It presents a way of representing points of interest (a landmark or an object) in a view of a real environment on an iPhone screen (pictured) 

The Apple AR glasses patent details a head-mounted, touch-screen display that could work alongside an iPhone. It presents a way of representing points of interest (a landmark or an object) in a view of a real environment on an iPhone screen (pictured) 

The Apple AR glasses patent details a head-mounted, touch-screen display that could work alongside an iPhone.  

It also presents a way of representing points of interest (a landmark or an object such as a moving car) in a view of a real environment on an iPhone screen, with interaction functionality. 

As such, the iPhone could potentially connect to the AR headset, allowing the wearer to see point of interest in real time. 

The patent for the AR glasses (artist's impression) was the work of AR software development firm Metaio, which Apple acquired in May 2015 after it developed 'thermal touch' - a way to trigger actions in digital content via a person's heat signature

The patent for the AR glasses (artist's impression) was the work of AR software development firm Metaio, which Apple acquired in May 2015 after it developed 'thermal touch' - a way to trigger actions in digital content via a person's heat signature

The patent for the AR glasses (artist’s impression) was the work of AR software development firm Metaio, which Apple acquired in May 2015 after it developed ‘thermal touch’ – a way to trigger actions in digital content via a person’s heat signature

The Apple AR glasses patent details a head-mounted, touch-screen display that could work alongside an iPhone.  

It also presents a way of representing points of interest (a landmark or an object such as a moving car) in a view of a real environment on an iPhone screen, with interaction functionality. 

As such, the iPhone could potentially connect to the AR headset, allowing the wearer to see point of interest in real time. 

This is particularly useful for AR apps such as tour guides for exploring new cities. 

Jeff Pu, an analyst Yuanta Investment Consulting, told Nikkei Asian Review that Apple’s AR glasses could go on sale at the end of 2019. 

The patent was the work of AR software development firm Metaio, which Apple acquired in May 2015 after it developed ‘thermal touch’ – a way to trigger actions in digital content via a person’s heat signature. 

Apple CEO Tim Cook has called augmented reality (AR) a ‘big idea’ and people will ‘have AR experiences every day, almost like eating three meals a day’.

APPLE’S AR IPHONE APPS 

In September, Apple’s new iOS 11 update included a new augmented reality platform.

The ‘ARKit’ augmented reality system uses the cameras on an iPhone to detect a flat surface, or ‘plane’ to put the virtual objects on, such as a table or floor.

With a combination of machine learning and the camera data, it can constantly adjust the image so the object appears secured to the correct surface without the ‘jitters’ or other AR systems.

One of the apps for Apple's new augmented reality platform is a virtual version of the Very Hungry Caterpillar that puts the much loved character in a child's living room, allowing them to feed and play with it until it transforms into a butterfly

One of the apps for Apple's new augmented reality platform is a virtual version of the Very Hungry Caterpillar that puts the much loved character in a child's living room, allowing them to feed and play with it until it transforms into a butterfly

One of the apps for Apple’s new augmented reality platform is a virtual version of the Very Hungry Caterpillar that puts the much loved character in a child’s living room, allowing them to feed and play with it until it transforms into a butterfly

ARKit also makes use of the camera sensor to estimate the total amount of light available in a scene and applies the correct amount of lighting to virtual objects. 

One of the apps for Apple’s new augmented reality platform is a virtual version of the Very Hungry Caterpillar that puts the much loved character in a child’s living room, allowing them to feed and play with it until it transforms into a butterfly.

The Walking Dead’ app allows users to fight zombies wherever they are: streets, parks, living rooms and backyards. 

But players won’t face the apocalypse alone; Rick, Daryl, Michonne and more iconic characters from the hit TV show will fight by their sides.