False widow spiders are crawling into UK homes to escape the cold

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  • Sudden drop in the temperature will force false widow spiders to seek refuge inside our houses as cold snap
  • United Kingdom faces three-week Arctic cold spell with temperatures that will be colder than parts of Russia
  • Prolonged cold spell expected to settle over UK towards end of November, with temperatures falling to -15C
  • Temperatures could be colder than usual from November 26 to December 10, with a much higher risk of snow 

Alexander Robertson For Mailonline

Britain will be hit by a -15C chill this month as a three-week winter snap brings snow to the southern England for the first time of the year.

It comes as a new warning is set to make you shudder instead of shiver, as thousands of the UK’s most venomous spiders desperately try to crawl into our centrally-heated homes to beat the cold.

Experts have warned that the sudden drop in the Mercury will force false widow spiders to seek refuge inside our houses as a widespread frost engulfs Britain.

Temperatures dropped as low as -3C across large swathes of the UK last night – making it one of the coldest mornings of the year so far.

The freezing weather began yesterday as snow dusted parts of England for the first time this autumn and it could get even colder by the end of the week.

Meteorologists also warned there could be worse to come after that, with a prolonged cold spell expected to settle over the country towards the end of the month and the possibility of temperatures falling as low as -15C.

Cumbria faced its first snowfall of the season Sunday morning, and fears have arose in Scotland over concern of low grit stocks heading into the winter.

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Langdon Beck in rural County Durham has started to freeze over with spectacular ice formations reaching across the surface of the river

Langdon Beck in rural County Durham has started to freeze over with spectacular ice formations reaching across the surface of the river

Langdon Beck in rural County Durham has started to freeze over with spectacular ice formations reaching across the surface of the river

Mist rises from the River Avon viewed from the Dundas Aqueduct as the sun rises near Bath in south western England

Mist rises from the River Avon viewed from the Dundas Aqueduct as the sun rises near Bath in south western England

Mist rises from the River Avon viewed from the Dundas Aqueduct as the sun rises near Bath in south western England

A jogger runs under  trees in Clifton, Bristol. Britain will be hit by a -15C chill this month as a three-week winter snap brings snow to the southern England for the first time of the year

A jogger runs under  trees in Clifton, Bristol. Britain will be hit by a -15C chill this month as a three-week winter snap brings snow to the southern England for the first time of the year

A jogger runs under trees in Clifton, Bristol. Britain will be hit by a -15C chill this month as a three-week winter snap brings snow to the southern England for the first time of the year

Experts have warned that the sudden drop in the Mercury will force false widow spiders to seek refuge inside our houses. One has already set up inside Janeane Williams’ house in Kingthorpe, Northampton

Experts have warned that the sudden drop in the Mercury will force false widow spiders to seek refuge inside our houses. One has already set up inside Janeane Williams’ house in Kingthorpe, Northampton

Experts have warned that the sudden drop in the Mercury will force false widow spiders to seek refuge inside our houses. One has already set up inside Janeane Williams’ house in Kingthorpe, Northampton

After a warm autumn, with temperatures above average, much colder weather has arrived in many parts of the UK, signalling the start of more wintery weather for the coming few weeks (pictured: Dundas Aqueduct near Bath)

After a warm autumn, with temperatures above average, much colder weather has arrived in many parts of the UK, signalling the start of more wintery weather for the coming few weeks (pictured: Dundas Aqueduct near Bath)

After a warm autumn, with temperatures above average, much colder weather has arrived in many parts of the UK, signalling the start of more wintery weather for the coming few weeks (pictured: Dundas Aqueduct near Bath)

A train full of sleepy commuters  slopes along the Ribblehead viaduct in the morning light as the sun rises over North Yorkshire today

A train full of sleepy commuters  slopes along the Ribblehead viaduct in the morning light as the sun rises over North Yorkshire today

A train full of sleepy commuters  slopes along the Ribblehead viaduct in the morning light as the sun rises over North Yorkshire today

The sun rises over the Washburn Valley in North Yorkshire, on a cold and frosty November morning today as temperatures begin to fall as a month-long snap falls across the UK

The sun rises over the Washburn Valley in North Yorkshire, on a cold and frosty November morning today as temperatures begin to fall as a month-long snap falls across the UK

The sun rises over the Washburn Valley in North Yorkshire, on a cold and frosty November morning today as temperatures begin to fall as a month-long snap falls across the UK

Temperatures dropped as low as -3C across large swathes of the UK last night - making it one of the coldest mornings of the year so far

Temperatures dropped as low as -3C across large swathes of the UK last night - making it one of the coldest mornings of the year so far

Temperatures dropped as low as -3C across large swathes of the UK last night – making it one of the coldest mornings of the year so far

Met Office forecaster Sophie Yeomans said: ‘We expect the coldest night of autumn with Monday morning as low as -8C in Scotland and -5C locally even in southern England.

‘Snow could fall on the north Pennines into Monday, as well as on Wales’ and Scotland’s hills and mountains. Low levels could see flurries in northern Scotland. Ice is possible and there will be a widespread frost.’

‘Midweek turns milder but it becomes colder on Friday and at the weekend, with showery conditions with snow possible over northern hills. There’s every possibility of temperatures as cold or colder than Monday morning.’

‘The following week has an increasing chance of generally cold weather with a risk of snow in places, especially the North.

‘From November 26 to December 10, temperatures look like being below normal generally, with an increased risk of snow at times, particularly in the North.’

The first snow of the season graced Northern England on Sunday, signalling winter has truly arrived. 

A Met Office spokesperson said: 'Snow could fall on the north Pennines into Monday, as well as on Wales and Scotland's hills and mountains. Low levels could see flurries in northern Scotland'

A Met Office spokesperson said: 'Snow could fall on the north Pennines into Monday, as well as on Wales and Scotland's hills and mountains. Low levels could see flurries in northern Scotland'

A Met Office spokesperson said: ‘Snow could fall on the north Pennines into Monday, as well as on Wales and Scotland’s hills and mountains. Low levels could see flurries in northern Scotland’

Britain faces a three-week Arctic cold spell with temperatures falling below that of parts of Russia. A widespread frost is threatening to engulf parts of England and Scotland. Pictured above, the Pennine Way in Cumbria on Sunday morning

Britain faces a three-week Arctic cold spell with temperatures falling below that of parts of Russia. A widespread frost is threatening to engulf parts of England and Scotland. Pictured above, the Pennine Way in Cumbria on Sunday morning

Britain faces a three-week Arctic cold spell with temperatures falling below that of parts of Russia. A widespread frost is threatening to engulf parts of England and Scotland. Pictured above, the Pennine Way in Cumbria on Sunday morning

The first widespread snowfall this season fell across parts of the Northern England last night. A covering of snow on the Pennines was a welcome sight for winter walkers taking in the brisk Arctic air on Hartside, Cumbria on Sunday

The first widespread snowfall this season fell across parts of the Northern England last night. A covering of snow on the Pennines was a welcome sight for winter walkers taking in the brisk Arctic air on Hartside, Cumbria on Sunday

The first widespread snowfall this season fell across parts of the Northern England last night. A covering of snow on the Pennines was a welcome sight for winter walkers taking in the brisk Arctic air on Hartside, Cumbria on Sunday

 A man wearing a parka jacket brushes the fresh snow off his car on a cold winter's morning yesterday in Tomintoul, Moray

 A man wearing a parka jacket brushes the fresh snow off his car on a cold winter's morning yesterday in Tomintoul, Moray

 A man wearing a parka jacket brushes the fresh snow off his car on a cold winter’s morning yesterday in Tomintoul, Moray

The first snow of the season graced Northern England and Scotland (pictured, the A9 near Inverness) on Sunday, signalling winter has truly arrived

The first snow of the season graced Northern England and Scotland (pictured, the A9 near Inverness) on Sunday, signalling winter has truly arrived

The first snow of the season graced Northern England and Scotland (pictured, the A9 near Inverness) on Sunday, signalling winter has truly arrived

The cold weather comes after a particularly mild autumn and the eighth warmest October since records began in 1910.

In Scotland, grit stocks are so low that road chiefs do not have enough to cover the amount used over the last two winters.

Amid fears parts of Scotland could risk running out of grit, salt stocks are at the lowest in five years, figures from the Scottish Government-backed Salt Group Situation Report show.

Scotland has 641,000 tonnes of salt – covering salt in stock, on order and in a strategic reserve – not be enough to cover the 691,000 tonnes spread in 2012-13 or the 645,000 tonnes used in 2010-11.

Road bosses have previously had up to 713,000 tonnes – 72,000 tonnes more – of salt in stock at this time of year.

The current shortfall of 72,000 tonnes would contain enough salt to grit 163,000 miles of roads – or Transport Scotland’s entire 2,115-mile trunk route network 77 times.

Scotland’s grit supplies at this time of year have fallen steadily fallen over the past five years, from 713,000 tonnes in 2012 to 709,000 tonnes in 2014, 674,000 tonnes in 2015 and 642,000 tonnes last year, previous Salt Group Situation reports show.

A motorist braves the snowy and icy conditions and went out in this morning in Tomintoul, Moray, as more snow is forecast

A motorist braves the snowy and icy conditions and went out in this morning in Tomintoul, Moray, as more snow is forecast

A motorist braves the snowy and icy conditions and went out in this morning in Tomintoul, Moray, as more snow is forecast

Dog walkers donned winter hats and heavy jackets as they strolled through Hartside, Cumbria, on Sunday morning following the first snow of the season

Dog walkers donned winter hats and heavy jackets as they strolled through Hartside, Cumbria, on Sunday morning following the first snow of the season

Dog walkers donned winter hats and heavy jackets as they strolled through Hartside, Cumbria, on Sunday morning following the first snow of the season

Transport Scotland said Scotland has more salt in stock than the 335,000 tonnes used last winter – but last winter was Scotland’s fourth warmest winter for 107 years, with grit use down by half on some recent winters as a result.

Cosla, which represents Scottish councils, said salt stocks were ‘more than sufficient.’

A Transport Scotland spokesperson said: ‘We plan across the year for our winter service and there is currently more salt in stock than was used for the whole of last winter.’

A Cosla spokesperson said: ‘Scotland’s councils take their duty very seriously. Councils have resilience plans are in place for winter. Salt stocks are more than sufficient from a council point of view.’

Scotland’s Transport Minister Humza Yousaf said: ‘Our teams work all year round to prepare for winter.’ 

The coldest night of autumn is expected early Monday morning, with temperatures hitting -7 degrees Celsius. Pictured above, a walker on the Pennine way in Cumbria

The coldest night of autumn is expected early Monday morning, with temperatures hitting -7 degrees Celsius. Pictured above, a walker on the Pennine way in Cumbria

The coldest night of autumn is expected early Monday morning, with temperatures hitting -7 degrees Celsius. Pictured above, a walker on the Pennine way in Cumbria